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Essential for Production Race Cars

Essential for Production Race Cars

I remember the days in the 80s and 90s, when one of the key skills in driving a production race car was keeping from bending your brake pad backers. ...
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Keeps my caliper seals from cooking.

Keeps my caliper seals from cooking.

The Brembo brakes on my Nissan Sport-sponsored 350Z T2 racecar are a huge strength. Using Hoosier R-compounds generates additional heat over the...
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Track Wisdom

"Very high [brake] temperatures can also cause the brake fluid to boil with a resultant increase in pedal travel. This should be detected immediately by the driver, as a very small quantity of boiling fluid is enough for the pedal to go right to the floor without any effect; in contrast to the liquid brake fluid, the boiling part is compressible. It is particularly important that when the car has been stopped for a short time -- up to 15 or 20 minutes after a drive in which the brakes have become very hot -- the pedal is depressed for a check. When the car is at rest, brakes act as a heat sink from which heat spreads to the fluid contained in the calipers; brakes which were fully operative when the car was driven may have become totally inefficient after it has stood awhile."

-- Paul Frere, Sports Car and Competition Driving

What should I do with my existing (OEM) shims?

What should you do with the existing (OEM) shims on your brake pads when installing our titanium brake heat shields? There is no single best answer to that, because of the variety of OEM shims out there. Some OEM shims are designed for noise damping while others are for blocking heat from the brake pads. Some are made from rubber like material, others from steel. Some have damping springs, others do not.

A good rule of thumb is that if the existing shim looks like stainless steel then you probably want to try to keep it on in addition to the new titanium brake shim. Although stainless steel is not as good a thermal insulator as our 6Al-4V titanium alloy, every little bit helps. If the existing shim is a softer metal such as welder's steel or aluminum, then go ahead and get rid of it.

If you are having trouble fitting your new titanium shims in with the existing shims, then you should probably go without the existing ones and use titanium only for maximum thermal protection. If you have any questions about the installation please don't hesitate to contact us.